Group Tour Info

The Harriet Tubman African American Museum located in Macon, Georgia

Group Tour Info

Group Tour FeesHC2008Tour
$6.00 for Adults*
$4.00 for Elementary and High School Students outside Bibb County
$3.00 for Bibb County Elementary and High School Students
$4.00 for College Students with College ID
Free for Children 3 and under

*1 Staff person free per 15 Students/Children

Click here to Request a Tour

Click here for ADA accessibility Info

 

Special Tour Packages:

Preschool

Grades Pre-K – K
Welcome to the Museum-Let’s Have Fun Learning 
This program uses songs, musical instruments and images to introduce the Museum to the group.


Elementary

Grades 1-2                      
True Stories and Tall Tales 
Students are introduced to Harriet Tubman by use of songs and games. Using the images from our changing galleries, students will explore art pieces to compare and contrast fictional stories as part of the tour.

You Too Can Be An Artist: Exploring Folk Art
Students learn the meaning of folk art and its significance. They learn that everyday items can be turned into works of art just by exploring his or her imagination. Students will be drawn to the fact that folk art is self-taught and comes totally from what’s within each of them. By simply envisioning a work of art you can take tree branches, old clothing, house paint, or any other items and turn them into works that one day may be in an art gallery because you too can be an artist.

Grade 3-6
Freedom Songs: Harriet Tubman, the Underground Railroad and the Songs of Freedom
Students learn about the life of former slave Harriet Tubman and her work as an abolitionist and conductor of the Underground Railroad. Freedom songs and spirituals are used as teaching aids. Students learn the answers to questions such as: Why did Harriet Tubman escape from the state of Maryland? How did she help people? Why were the freedom songs and spirituals important? What did the songs teach?

Grades 4-6  
William and Ellen’s Ticket to Freedom: The William and Ellen Craft Story 
Students learn about the lives of William and Ellen Craft, two runaways from slavery in Macon, Georgia, including their escape plan and route to freedom. They also gain a sense of t he political and social climate leading up to the Civil War through the Reconstruction Period. Students learn the answers to such questions as: What was life like for Ellen Smith in Clinton, Georgia? What were some of the customs of the white gentry? Why was Ellen so unhappy? How did the Compromise of 1850 and the Fugitive Slave Bill affect William and Ellen?

Grades 5-12                    
The Inventor’s Gallery: From the Minds of African Americans 
Students learn about the everyday inventions that African Americans created throughout history. The  gallery celebrates the ingenuity as well as the perseverance and creativity of African American  inventors. Students will also explore questions such as: what are some things that you have thought of that could one day become an invention? Even if it does not work the first time should you quit or continue to explore that idea? Should you listen to others when they tell you that you idea is no good? We challenge students through this gallery to always follow their dreams and ideas to the fullest.

Middle School

Grades 1-12                    
You Too Can Be An Artist: Exploring Folk Art
Students learn the meaning of folk art and its significance. They learn that everyday items can be turned into works of art just by exploring his or her imagination. Students will be drawn to the fact that folk art is self-taught and comes totally from what’s within each of them. By simply envisioning a work of art you can take tree branches, old clothing, house paint, or any other items and turn them into works that one day may be in an art gallery because you too can be an artist.

Grades 5-12                    
The Inventor’s Gallery: From the Minds of African Americans 
Students learn about the everyday inventions that African Americans created throughout history. The gallery celebrates the ingenuity as well as the perseverance and creativity of African American inventors. Students will also explore questions such as: what are some things that you have thought of that could one day become an invention? Even if it does not work the first time should you quit or continue to explore that idea? Should you listen to others when they tell you that you idea is no good? We challenge students through this gallery to always follow their dreams and ideas to the fullest.

Grades 6-12                    
Fighting for a Cause: The Story of William and Ellen Craft 
What makes William and Ellen’s story so powerful? Students learn about he lives of these two local heroes and explore the questions: What might have taken place if they were caught? What other communities were settled by former slaves? How did the couple try to make a difference in each community they lived? How can you make a positive change in your community?


High School

Grades 1-12                    
You Too Can Be An Artist: Exploring Folk Art
Students learn the meaning of folk art and its significance. They learn that everyday items can be turned into works of art just by exploring his or her imagination. Students will be drawn to the fact that folk art is self-taught and comes totally from what’s within each of them. By simply envisioning a work of art you can take tree branches, old clothing, house paint, or any other items and turn them into works that one day may be in an art gallery because you too can be an artist.

Grades 5-12                    
The Inventor’s Gallery: From the Minds of African Americans  
Students learn about the everyday inventions that African Americans created throughout history. The gallery celebrates the ingenuity as well as the perseverance and creativity of African American inventors. Students will also explore questions such as: what are some things that you have thought of that could one day become an invention? Even if it does not work the first time should you quit or continue to explore that idea? Should you listen to others when they tell you that you idea is no good? We challenge students through this gallery to always follow their dreams and ideas to the fullest.

 

ADA Accessibility Info

 

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